The Top Twenty--a Prime Page Collection

Generalized Woodall

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The Prime Pages keeps a list of the 5000 largest known primes, plus a few each of certain selected archivable forms and classes. These forms are defined in this collection's home page. This page is about one of those forms. Comments and suggestions requested.

(up) Definitions and Notes

In 1905, the Reverend Cullen was interested in the numbers n.2n+1 (denoted Cn).  He noticed that the first, C1=3, was prime, but with the possible exception of the 53rd, the next 99 were all composite.  Very soon afterwards, Cunningham discovered that 5591 divides C53, and noted these numbers are composite for all n in the range 2 < n < 200, with the possible exception of 141.  Five decades later Robinson showed C141 was a prime.

It was natural next to seek primes of the form n.2n-1, now called Woodall numbers, and then the Generalized Woodall primes: the primes of the form n.bn-1 with n+2 > b. The reason for the restriction on the exponent n is simple, without some restriction every prime p would be a generalized Woodall because:

p = 1.(p+1)1-1.
Curiously, these numbers may be hard to recognize when written in standard form.  For example, they may be like
18740*3168662-1
which could be written
168660*3168660-1.
More difficult to spot are those like the following:
9750*729250-1 = 9750*73*9750-1 = 9750*3439750-1
8511*2374486-1 = (8511*22)*211*8511*4-1 = 34044*204834044-1.

(up) Record Primes of this Type

rankprime digitswhowhencomment
1334310 · 211334310 - 1 777037 p350 Apr 2012 Generalized Woodall
241676 · 7875197 - 1 739632 L2777 Mar 2012 Generalized Woodall
3404882 · 43404882 - 1 661368 p310 Feb 2011 Generalized Woodall
4563528 · 13563528 - 1 627745 p262 Dec 2009 Generalized Woodall
5190088 · 5760352 - 1 531469 L2841 Aug 2012 Generalized Woodall
61035092 · 31035092 - 1 493871 L3544 Jun 2013 Generalized Woodall
7216290 · 167216290 - 1 480757 L2777 Oct 2012 Generalized Woodall
8176660 · 18353320 - 1 443519 p325 Sep 2011 Generalized Woodall
9182402 · 14364804 - 1 418118 p325 Sep 2011 Generalized Woodall
1015266 · 12366385 - 1 395401 p325 Sep 2011 Generalized Woodall
11125132 · 6500528 - 1 389492 L2777 Jan 2012 Generalized Woodall
12163747 · 6491241 - 1 382266 L2841 Apr 2012 Generalized Woodall
1389725 · 21256151 - 1 378145 p260 Dec 2012 Generalized Woodall
14178602 · 5535806 - 1 374518 L2777 Mar 2012 Generalized Woodall
15154962 · 221154962 - 1 363297 L3269 Sep 2012 Generalized Woodall
16120585 · 21205851 - 1 363003 p260 Dec 2012 Generalized Woodall
17153222 · 223153222 - 1 359818 L2777 Oct 2012 Generalized Woodall
18193558 · 72193558 - 1 359507 p357 Oct 2013 Generalized Woodall
19113756 · 10341268 - 1 341274 L3532 Jun 2013 Generalized Woodall
20166585 · 68166585 - 1 305274 p357 Apr 2013 Generalized Woodall

(up) Related Pages

(up) References

CW17
A. J. C. Cunningham and H. J. Woodall, "Factorisation of Q=(2q ± q) and q*2q ± 1," Math. Mag., 47 (1917) 1--38. [A classic paper in the history of the study of Cullen numbers. See also [Keller95]]
Guy94 (section B2)
R. K. Guy, Unsolved problems in number theory, Springer-Verlag, 1994.  New York, NY, ISBN 0-387-94289-0. MR 96e:11002 [An excellent resource! Guy briefly describes many open questions, then provides numerous references. See his newer editions of this text.]
Keller83
W. Keller, "Factors of Fermat numbers and large primes of the form k· 2n +1," Math. Comp., 41 (1983) 661-673.  MR 85b:11117
Keller95
W. Keller, "New Cullen primes," Math. Comp., 64 (1995) 1733-1741.  Supplement S39-S46.  MR 95m:11015
Ribenboim95 (p. 360-361)
P. Ribenboim, The new book of prime number records, 3rd edition, Springer-Verlag, 1995.  New York, NY, pp. xxiv+541, ISBN 0-387-94457-5. MR 96k:11112 [An excellent resource for those with some college mathematics. Basically a Guinness Book of World Records for primes with much of the relevant mathematics. The extensive bibliography is seventy-five pages.]
Riesel69
H. Riesel, "Some factors of the numbers Gn = 62n + 1 and Hn = 102n + 1," Math. Comp., 23:106 (1969) 413--415.  MR 39:6813
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